Category Archives: Tips and Ideas

Puffy Popovers

46_CarlTremblay_PuffyPopovers_BakingClass.jpgMakes 12

These treats are light and airy and yummy! Bake up a batch as a quick and easy after-school snack.

Preheat the oven to 375⁰ F (190⁰ C).

Here’s What You Need

1-2 tablespoons butter

2 eggs

1 cup milk

1 cup flour

½ teaspoon salt
Here’s What You Do

  1. Place a small pat of butter in the center of each cup in a 12-cup muffin pan. Put the pan in the oven for just a minute or two to melt the butter, and then take it out.
  2. Whisk the eggs in a large bowl. Add the milk, flour, and salt. Whisk until most of the lumps are gone.
  3. Transfer the batter to a large measuring cup for easy pouring. Pour the batter into the buttered muffin pan cups, filling each about two-thirds full.
  4. Bake the popovers for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden brown and puffy. Remove the pan from the oven. Carefully pop them out of the muffin pan with a butter knife. Eat right away! They’re extra delicious with jam and honey.

47_CarlTremblay_PopoversHowTo4_BakingClass.jpg

A Science Experiment You Can Eat!

Did you know that all baking is basically kitchen chemistry? Baking combines various ingredients and uses heat (and sometimes other steps, like kneading dough) to create a reaction that turns the ingredients into something different.

To make a perfect popover that’s crispy on the outside and hollow on the inside, you need a hot oven, flour, and eggs. Imagine your popover is like a hot air balloon: The shell of the balloon is made of the protein in the eggs and flour. The steam comes from the hot liquid (the milk) heating up and evaporating. As it fills with hot air, the balloon “pops over” the sides of the pan, making it a tasty chemistry experiment!

Excerpted from Baking Class © by Deanna F. Cook. Used with permission from Storey Publishing.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Resources, Recipes, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized

Pastry Chef’s Guide to Sprouted Wheat Bread Flour Basics

stephaniepetersonYou may have noticed bread labels sprouting “sprouted wheat flour” as an ingredient. It’s even now available for home bakers! This fall’s baking season is a great time to explore the world of sprouted wheat flour baking, but you won’t have to repeat my mistakes!  Start your adventure with HBA member Panhandle Milling Company‘s Pastry Chef Stephanie Petersen’s guide and recipe!

Natural sprouted grain flours are among some of the most nutrient-dense foods you can add to your diet. If you’re like a lot of people who have tried to bake with sprouted wheat and found a few challenges, you’re not alone. In this article, we’re give you some great tips for using these flours in your bread baking that will give you great results.  Our seasoned pastry chef struggled with this flour through several experiments in our test kitchen before she finally found some tips to increase your success. Hopefully these will help you on your journey!

  • Knead more or add gluten. Sprouted hard wheat flour is slightly lower in viable gluten-content for easy dough structure. Increase the kneading time in your standard recipes by a few minutes, or add a 1-2 teaspoons vital wheat gluten per cup (depending on the baked product).
  • No long fermentation needed. Classically trained bread bakers know that long slow fermentation gives dough the deepest flavor and character. During this fermentation, the enzymes in the wheat go through some changes like the sprouting process. The depth of flavor can be achieved in a very short amount of time with sprouted flours. Longer fermentation will cause sprouted flour to not raise as much as it would with a short raise.
  • Cup for cup.You can use sprouted flour the same as you would use un-sprouted flour, cup for cup.
  • Sprouted spelt is different. Though it is a wheat variety, it contains less gluten than all other wheat varieties. Spelt does not rise as high as other wheat varieties due to the low gluten content.
  • Avoid rancidity.Sprouted flours should be stored in a cool, dark, dry place in an airtight container and is best consumed within 12 months. The freshness can be extended by at least 6 months in the refrigerator and another 6 months in the freezer.
  • Be safe. Treat all flour like it is a raw product. Store raw flour away from ready-to-eat foods. Keep the measuring of unbaked dough away from areas where baked products are stored. Clean work surfaces with hot soapy water before and after baking with raw flour and doughs. Wash hands after handling raw dough and before tasting any baked goods. Bake all bread to a safe internal temperature (190°-210° F). 

IMG_1018
No-Fail Sprouted Wheat Bread

This recipe is one that our chef perfected after many loaves. We think you’ll agree, it is great for bread! There are many more ways to use this versatile dough. It’s a quick recipe. The bread is ready to bake in about an hour! Yield: 2 loaves.

Filtered water| 2 cups
Olive Oil| 1/4 cup
Honey| 2 Tbsp.
Sea Salt| 2 tsp
Sprouted Whole White Wheat Flour |6-7 cups

Vital Wheat gluten powder*|1/4 cup
Active Dry Yeast| 1 Tbsp.

Directions: 

  1. Wash and sanitize all work surfaces and tools.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the flour, sea salt and vital wheat gluten*.
  3. Measure liquid ingredients into a second large bowl. Add the yeast using only half the flour and adding yeast last.
  4. Mix gently until the flour is moistened. Continue mixing, adding flour until the dough comes away from the sides and bottom of bowl.
  5. Knead 8–10 minutes by hand or 4-5 minutes with a mixer using the dough hook on medium speed. Form into a ball and place in a gallon-sized bowl. Cover with plastic and allow to raise about 30 minutes. Deflate dough. Divide dough into two equal portions. Shape into loaves and place in greased 8 inch by 4-inch loaf pans.
  6. Wash and sanitize hands and work surfaces again.
  7. Let rise until doubled or 1″ above pan (we suggest covering it loosely with a tented plastic grocery bag or misting with water and placing in a cool oven.) Preheat oven to 350° F. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until at least 190° internal temperature. Cool on racks. Slice after 15 minutes, store or freeze after 2-3 hours.

* Use of vital wheat gluten is optional, but our test kitchen has found this addition to give the most consistent results without having to knead excessively. If you omit this, increase your kneading time by at least 3 minutes by hand, if not longer.

by Stephanie Petersen

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Resources, Recipes, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized

Savory Galette: A to Z

sharon_kitchen
Who can resist seeing your own child bake and serve something amazing?  Whether they’re 5 and serving you their first muffin or twenty-five you’re savoring the moments. Granted, at five, somedays it’s hard to choose–“should I let them help and pay the “time and clean-up price” or do-it-myself?” Let me show you the pay-off.

Last weekend our 24-year old daughter served up an amazing Potato Leek Galette with Rosemary Sea Salt Crust for a shared Sunday supper.

We grew the Yukon Gold potatoes and onions in our Community Garden—she bought the leeks at the Farmer’s market and harvested her own fresh rosemary.

PotatoLeekRosemaryGalette

Katy’s recipe came from Cara Mangini, October/November 2017 Fine Cooking magazine.

From a teacher’s perspective, I love teaching people how to bake a Galette. Young bakers succeed and go home and can bake them on an oven-proof dinner plate–perfect for students who may not have a lot of baking pans yet.

For the Recipe Buzz” on galettes, sweet or savory, starting with “A” for Asparagus Galette and ending with a beautiful Zucchini Galette

For a ready-to-go lesson on baking a Rustic Fruit Pie (Galette), download Book and Bake Easy-as-Pie, filled with pie lore and apples galore.  See a How-to video, www.HomeBaking.org, the Baking Channel.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Resources, Recipes, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized

June 17: National Festival of Breads

NFOB-breads-card

Do you love to bake, or just love bread in general? Would you like to hone your baking and barbecue skills? Looking for a fun activity for the kids on a summer Saturday? Then the National Festival of Breads is just the event for you.

This fun, family-friendly festival will be held on Saturday, June 17, 2017, at the Hilton Garden Inn, 410 South 3rd Street, Manhattan, Kansas. Additional events will be held across the blocked-off street at the Blue Earth Plaza.
Admission is free with the donation of a canned or nonperishable food item. These donations will be given to the Flint Hills Breadbasket.
To start the day off, there is an Enrich Your Life 5K at 7:30 a.m., and at 8:15 a.m.the 1 mile fun run begins. The Festival opens to the public at 8:30 a.m., and bread-baking contestants will begin preparing their winning bread recipes. The eight finalists for National Festival of Breads were chosen from entries that came from all across the United States.
Baking demonstrations will be going on throughout the day, beginning at 8:30 a.m.Torie Cox, food stylist with Time Inc., will demonstrate her “Cinnamon Swirl Brioche Loaf” all done by hand! Cookbook author and physician Jeff Hertzberg will present his “The New Artisan Bread In Five Minutes a Day: Mixing dough for refrigerator storage and basic loaf shaping” at 9:30 a.m. Hertzberg will show us how to mix basic doughs and shaping techniques. At 10:30 a.m., Paula Gray, Manager for Bake for Goods Kids Program, will demonstrate her “Bake for Good: Get Rolling with King Arthur Flour!” She will also show us some basic yeast dough tips and how to shape dinner rolls. Jeff Hertzberg will give a second presentation at 12:30 p.m., titled “Artisan Pizza and Flatbread In Five Minutes a Day: Pizza and flatbreads, the fastest breads In the world.” He will demonstrate the versatility of the flatbread. At 1:30 p.m., Sharon Davis, Family & Consumer Sciences educator with the Home Baking Association, will demonstrate her “Be a Smart Snack Baker!” She will teach us how to be healthy smart snackers.
From bread to barbecue, the Festival has it all. In the barbecue tent, Rod Gray of Pellet Envy, will demonstrate how he cooks his delicious barbecue that he pours his heart and soul into. He will give three presentations, at 10:00 a.m., noon and 2:00 p.m.
In between barbecue demonstrations, the Festival boasts live music from the Past Blasters.
Other events that the Festival of Breads has to offer are wheat weaving demonstrations, bread samples, trade show of vendors, Mr. and Mrs. Slice, a kids area that will have hands-on pancake making, and demonstrations from the Backyard Kitchen.
The Festival wraps up at 3:00 p.m., when the finalists deliver their winning breads to the judges. An announcement of the National Festival of Breads Champion will be made later in the evening via the website, nationalfestivalofbreads.com and Facebook pages (@nationalfestivalofbreads).
So come on out and join us at the Hilton Garden Inn, 410 South 3rd Street, Manhattan, Kansas for fresh bread, barbecue, demonstrations, live music and much much more! We hope to see you at the National Festival of Breads. We’re positive you’ll love it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Resources, Recipes, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized

The Power of Eggs

eggs_blogEvery ingredient in baking packs its own unique power.   January is perfect to focus on the simple but powerful egg. Here to help is the 2016 Home Baking Association educator award winner, Delaine Stendahl. Her new lesson, The Power of Eggs, is now available online. In her award-winning lesson, bakers explore how eggs function to:

  1. Leaven, or add air spaces. Long before we had baking soda or powder we relied on beaten whole eggs or whites to add air to batter. Waffles and angel food cakes are perfect examples of beaten egg white foam used to leaven in recipes.
  2. Bind, or hold together ingredients when baked, like cracked wheat and lean beef meatballs, soft cookies, cake or muffins.
  3.  Coagulate and hold the shape and open texture of baked goods, like cream puffs and popovers. Meringue can stand alone when baked as a gluten-free cookie like the Forgotten Cookie (Baking with Friends, HomeBaking.org ) or topping a pie or even as a pie shell. My mother made meringue as a savory egg-in-a-nest entrée.
  4. Emulsify or hold together in suspension two ingredients that don’t like to mix, as liquid and fat in a pudding or a lemon curd .
  5. Provide smooth texture in the pound cake or egg-rich yeast breads, and Portuguese Sweet Bread.
  6. Add color and browning with egg as an ingredient or by using an egg wash brushed on the surface of breads just before baking. View How to Use an Egg Wash. Also, check out our Dough Sculpting 101 lesson–  Learn to egg wash, p. 3
  7. Nourish morning, noon, snacks or night. Eggs, at only 70 calories each, add 13 essential vitamins and minerals such as vitamins B12, D and E, choline, and iron, 6 grams protein, and minimal sodium and sugars.

The Power of Eggs as a baking ingredient is delivered via foods we love. Eggs are great to “use what we have on hand” for family meals, crepes, egg noodles, omelets, frittatas, make-ahead stratas, hard-cooked in sandwiches or tossed salads and for nutritious desserts like early colonial puddings , custards, and flan.

Want to learn more? Check out A Bakers Dozen DVD Lessons for Better Baking or A Bakers Dozen Lab Manual for more about eggs as the super baking ingredient.

educator_award.jpg

Don’t forget to enter YOUR great baking lesson. You may receive the 2017 Educator Award. Go to HomeBaking.org for more info.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Resources, Educator Resources, Home Baking Association, Recipes, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized

Celebrate National Breakfast Month

September is National Breakfast Month

image

If back to school means back to busy mornings at your house, don’t let the hectic rush force you to sacrifice breakfast. September is National Breakfast Month – a good time to commit to incorporating a smart morning meal into your family’s daily routine.

Make sure that breakfast is as healthy as it is tasty by including grains and protein as part of the meal. Grains are an important part of daily dietary needs; strive for two or three servings each morning to get a good start on the six servings you need each day. Protein means staying power: these foods will keep you and your kids feeling energized all morning long. Here are some tips to help ensure that your family gets a nutritious start to even the busiest of days:

  • Making a simple, healthy breakfast can be one of a young child’s first “I can do that!” moments in the kitchen. Set out two or three boxes of favorite cereals and teach your preschooler to pour it into a bowl. Use a small scoop or measuring cup to demonstrate portion size. Incorporate her participation into the morning routine, and before you know it, she really will be handling it by herself.
  • Teach kids the difference in the nutrition profile of cereal by using the “topping” method. Three-quarters of the bowl could be a whole grain, low-sugar cereal.
    Colored cereals or those with higher sugar content can be sprinkled lightly on top.
  • Use weekends wisely. If you’re whipping up pancakes or waffles one lazy Saturday morning, make an extra batch to be enjoyed during the week. Wrap in plastic, store in the refrigerator or freezer, and warm in the microwave or toaster when ready to eat.
  • For a fast, tasty start to the morning, nothing beats the simplicity of toast. Top with peanut, almond or cashew butter, or melted goat or feta cheese, for protein staying-power. A sprinkle of fresh herbs like chopped basil or sage, or a spice like ground ginger or cinnamon, adds important anti-oxidants.
  • Also easy: Toast an English muffin or bagel, and add a sliced hard-boiled egg, slice of ham, Swiss cheese or anything else you have on hand that appeals to your taste buds for a quick breakfast sandwich.
  • Absolutely no prep time? Open a box of whole wheat crackers, grab a banana or apple, and head out the door!
  • Kids will enjoy creating their own combinations of breakfast trail mix. Fill small plastic baggies with a mix of healthful, whole grain cereals, sunflower seeds, chopped almonds or walnuts and dried fruit. Keep a stash on hand to grab when eating in the car.
  • And finally: Get in the habit of taking 10 minutes before turning off the kitchen lights each night to set up for the next morning. Make sure that backpacks, homework and balls for after-school soccer practice are in place. Recharge your cell phone. Clear the kitchen counter. Little tasks like these take up valuable time on busy mornings; addressing them the night before will leave more time to focus on breakfast the next day

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Resources, Educator Resources, Recipes, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized

Bake for Family Fun Month: Week 3

bakeforfamilyfun2016

As much as I enjoy Downton Abbey, history and tradition embodies why I bake. American families and communities most often did not come with a wait and culinary staff. “Doing for ourselves” included baking.

To quote Ruskin from a 1906 Cook Book compiled by Annie R. Gregory,

“ To be a good cook means the economy of your great-grandmothers and the science of modern chemists. It means much tasting and no wasting. It means English thoroughness, French art and Arabian hospitality. It means, in fine, that you are to see that everyone has something nice to eat.”

images

This week’s Bake for Family Fun month connections highlight baking history and building our own traditions.

  1. Make time to Book and Bake. “Book” time to read a book and recipe for a meal or snack. Blueberries for Sal is a classic.
  2. Include, or require, young children and teens in the kitchen. Create a “baking corner” to work where they lay out tools and ingredients to prepare staples like Biscuits or America’s Favorite Batter Bread
  1. Weekly home crafted pizza is an essential tradition to help teens build assets and manage food budgets.
  2. Place your orders for Whole Grain All Star Pizza
  3. Doughnuts and fritters have long been a weekly treat in many homes! Consider a DIY dozen—it can cost less than $3.00—baked or fried 
  4. Pancake “art” is a fabulous family tradition. You won’t see IHOP making “your name here” cakes.  or  squiggle the batter for critters or shapes for max creativity. Remember: pre-oil, then heat the griddle or skillet, flip the shape when bubbles appear on the batter surface and flip ‘em only once for maximum fluff factor.

This week our daughter baked banana bread from a home town Centennial cook book. Virginia Becker, a genuinely wonderful woman and creator of the recipe, is surely smiling down on her magic mix of only six ingredients.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baking Events & Holidays, Baking Resources, Educator Resources, Home Baking Association, Tips and Ideas, Uncategorized