Tag Archives: baking recipes

Give the Gift of How-to-Bake 

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After 35 years of baking everywhere and anyway I can with anyone 2 to 92 who’d join me, I love to find new ideas, recipes and resources to get the flour in the bowl and the heart and mind engaged.  It takes more than a cool app or web-site to get a baking buzz going in today’s kitchens.  There are at least three challenges to overcome:

  • Skill comfort to bake alone OR an available baking assistant
  • Available ingredients and tools
  • Time (inversely related to skill—the more baking skill, the less time you’ll need)

HomeBaking.org is ALWAYS a great place to start, so let me introduce our newest Writer’s Guild member, Deanna F. Cook. Deanna is a kids-cooking best-selling author, content director at Kidstir, as well as an acquisitions editor at Storey Publishing. She lives in western Massachusetts and is found online at deannafcook.com.

Her newest book, Baking Class, 2017, Storey Publishing, ISBN 978-1-61212-855-9, is perfect for building baking skills, baking for the family, and giving to someone you love.

Baking+Classcoverphoto

You can’t replace baking together as a gift that nourishes the whole person for a lifetime.  Contributing something you’ve baked for a meal or event builds self-sufficiency and true self-esteem. Deanna’s “baking companion” works great for kids ages 6–12 and features 50 easy-to-follow recipes.

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Deanna shares, “I invited more than 20 children over to my kitchen and we baked together and photographed the steps along the way. All the recipes are easy to follow, fun to look at, and can be made by kids with just a little help from a grown-up. “

Step-by-step photos teach bakers-in-training how to knead dough, make biscuits, popovers, decorate cookies, and make a perfect pie, along with essential skills like measuring flour and decorating a cake—perfect for meals or made-by-me-for-you gift giving!

You’ll start a new holiday meal “must-have” with Puffy Popovers, Just 5 ingredients—2 tablespoons butter, 2 eggs, 1cup milk, 1 cup all-purpose flour, and ½ teaspoon salt, a muffin cup pan and an oven! Popovers are “a science experiment you can eat” and MUST be locally made—yet another plus.

Teachers, get the total buy-in of students and parents by hosting an early childhood baking workshop using the Baking Class resources.

When you wrap a book to give, why not include a “time certificate,” for a date and place to bake some recipes side-by-side in 2018? It’s the gift that keeps on giving.

Click here to get the recipe and instructions for Puffy Popovers

 

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Puffy Popovers

46_CarlTremblay_PuffyPopovers_BakingClass.jpgMakes 12

These treats are light and airy and yummy! Bake up a batch as a quick and easy after-school snack.

Preheat the oven to 375⁰ F (190⁰ C).

Here’s What You Need

1-2 tablespoons butter

2 eggs

1 cup milk

1 cup flour

½ teaspoon salt
Here’s What You Do

  1. Place a small pat of butter in the center of each cup in a 12-cup muffin pan. Put the pan in the oven for just a minute or two to melt the butter, and then take it out.
  2. Whisk the eggs in a large bowl. Add the milk, flour, and salt. Whisk until most of the lumps are gone.
  3. Transfer the batter to a large measuring cup for easy pouring. Pour the batter into the buttered muffin pan cups, filling each about two-thirds full.
  4. Bake the popovers for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden brown and puffy. Remove the pan from the oven. Carefully pop them out of the muffin pan with a butter knife. Eat right away! They’re extra delicious with jam and honey.

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A Science Experiment You Can Eat!

Did you know that all baking is basically kitchen chemistry? Baking combines various ingredients and uses heat (and sometimes other steps, like kneading dough) to create a reaction that turns the ingredients into something different.

To make a perfect popover that’s crispy on the outside and hollow on the inside, you need a hot oven, flour, and eggs. Imagine your popover is like a hot air balloon: The shell of the balloon is made of the protein in the eggs and flour. The steam comes from the hot liquid (the milk) heating up and evaporating. As it fills with hot air, the balloon “pops over” the sides of the pan, making it a tasty chemistry experiment!

Excerpted from Baking Class © by Deanna F. Cook. Used with permission from Storey Publishing.

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Savory Galette: A to Z

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Who can resist seeing your own child bake and serve something amazing?  Whether they’re 5 and serving you their first muffin or twenty-five you’re savoring the moments. Granted, at five, somedays it’s hard to choose–“should I let them help and pay the “time and clean-up price” or do-it-myself?” Let me show you the pay-off.

Last weekend our 24-year old daughter served up an amazing Potato Leek Galette with Rosemary Sea Salt Crust for a shared Sunday supper.

We grew the Yukon Gold potatoes and onions in our Community Garden—she bought the leeks at the Farmer’s market and harvested her own fresh rosemary.

PotatoLeekRosemaryGalette

Katy’s recipe came from Cara Mangini, October/November 2017 Fine Cooking magazine.

From a teacher’s perspective, I love teaching people how to bake a Galette. Young bakers succeed and go home and can bake them on an oven-proof dinner plate–perfect for students who may not have a lot of baking pans yet.

For the Recipe Buzz” on galettes, sweet or savory, starting with “A” for Asparagus Galette and ending with a beautiful Zucchini Galette

For a ready-to-go lesson on baking a Rustic Fruit Pie (Galette), download Book and Bake Easy-as-Pie, filled with pie lore and apples galore.  See a How-to video, www.HomeBaking.org, the Baking Channel.

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National Festival of Breads Was A Smashing Success!

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Ronna Farley of Rockville, Maryland, is the grand prize winner in the 2017 National Festival of Breads baking competition, sponsored by King Arthur Flour, Red Star Yeast and the Kansas Wheat Commission.

DIYWWWafflesSummer may not be everyone’s favorite season to bake. Statistics say a lot less flour is sold in the hot months.  But personally, I know thousands who never miss a baking beat in the heat. They’re the passionate, the competitive, the DIY fresh-is-best bakers and teachers of children, grand children and teens.

A few thousand of these summer bakers gathered at The National Festival of Breads June 17 in Manhattan, KS, our nation’s only amateurs-only bread-baking competition sponsored by King Arthur Flour, Red Star Yeast and the Kansas Wheat Commission. There they observed eight finalists bake to win.

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Ronna Farley of Rockville, Maryland, took the grand prize with her whole grain Seeded Corn and Onion Bubble Loaf.

You’ll love the creativity of these home bakers in the hall-of-fame archives from all five National Festivals

btl Festival of Breads

Equally avid were the hundreds seated at the baking demos and stopping by our exhibit. Teachers were gathering baking science, math and literacy connections for their agriculture, English, speech, early childhood, culinary, elementary, middle school, family and consumer sciences, foods and nutrition classrooms.   Add the volunteer leaders teaching grand children, 4-H, youth library programs and afterschool groups and we should all re-double our efforts to share the wealth baking provides. Thanks is always due to those who teach.

Baking is the perfect way to keep children learning throughout the summer.  Explore yeast leavening science and learn the difference between baking powder and baking soda! Choose from history and cultural recipes.

Assign baking A-Z exploration in our Baking Glossary. Connect with baking help plus tips and techniques from our member’s test kitchen pros.

Catch the passion to go from virtual to actual and get the flour, butter, and leavening in the bowl!  You can “bake for good,” bake while you camp, take the baking math challenge of measuring and mixing to savor summer success.

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National Festival of Breads Winner Announced

Ronna Farley NFOB 2017 winner

MANHATTAN, Kan. (June 17, 2017) – Ronna Farley of Rockville, Maryland, is the grand prize winner in the 2017 National Festival of Breads baking competition, sponsored by King Arthur Flour, Red Star Yeast and the Kansas Wheat Commission.

Judges selected Farley’s Seeded Corn and Onion Bubble Loaf from among eight finalist recipes baked at the public competition on June 17 in Manhattan. The National Festival of Breads is the nation’s only amateur bread-baking competition.

Farley’s Seeded Corn and Onion Bubble Loaf was entered in the competition’s “Whole Grain Breads” category.

This was Farley’s second time in the National Festival of Breads as a top eight finalist. Along with her champion recipe, Seeded Corn and Onion Bubble Loaf, she also received an honorable mention in the rolls category for her recipe, Sharp Cheddar Bay Knots.

As the 2017 National Festival of Breads champion, Farley received $2,000 cash, plus a trip to attend a baking class of her choice at the King Arthur Flour Baking Education Center in Norwich, Vermont. In addition, she will receive a supply (120 envelopes) of Red Star Yeast.

Judges for the event were Betty Kandt, retired FACS teacher, Manhattan, Kansas; Jennifer Latzke, associate editor, High Plains Journal, Dodge City, Kansas; Dr. Jeff Hertzberg, cookbook author and physician, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Jenn Wisdom, HyVee bakery manager, Manhattan, Kansas; Aaron Clanton, American Institute of Baking, Manhattan, Kansas; Torie Cox, food stylist, Time, Inc., Birmingham, Alabama; and Mike Dandrea, USA Pan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The champion recipe and all eight finalists’ recipes are available at http://nationalfestivalofbreads.com.

In addition to the competition, the National Festival of Breads featured educational baking demonstrations, children’s activities, bread tasting and more. This was the fifth biennial event, and “BBQ Like A Pro” demonstrations and sampling were held in conjunction with the baking contest. The more than 3,000 attendees brought nonperishable food items as admission to the National Festival of Breads, which were donated to the Flint Hills Breadbasket, a community food network in Manhattan to help alleviate hunger and poverty.

The finalists for each category and special award winners included:

Time-Saving & Simple Breads Category: Mexican Street Corn Skillet Bread, Michele Kusma, Columbus, Ohio; and Southwest Focaccia, Jane Fry, Elk Falls, Kansas.

Holiday Breads Category: Toasted Cardamom Nordic Crown, Patrice Hurd, Bemidji, Minnesota; and Orange-Spice Anadama Wreath with Walnuts and Dates, Kellie White, Valley Park, Missouri.

Roll Category: Orange Marmalade Breakfast Crescents, Pam Correll, Brockport, Pennsylvania; and Turmeric-Rosemary & Sweet Potato Rosettes, Tiffany Aaron, Quitman, Arkansas.

Whole Grain Breads Category: Seeded Corn and Onion Bubble Loaf, Ronna Farley, Rockville, Maryland ; and Butternut Romesco Braid, Shauna Havey, Roy, Utah.

Additional information about the 2017 National Festival of Breads, including the finalists’ recipes and a complete list of sponsors, is available at NationalFestivalofBreads.com.

King Arthur Flour is not only the nation’s oldest flour company, it is the single largest educator of home bakers in the world. Founded in 1790 and employee-owned since 1996, the company conducts free baking classes nationwide for both adults and children, and offers a wide variety of hands-on baking classes at its Baking Education Center in Vermont. King Arthur Flour’s fundamental mission is to be an education and product resource for, and inspiration to, bakers worldwide. More information is available at kingarthurflour.com.

For more than a century, home bakers have trusted the high quality and consistent performance of Red Star®, SAF® and bakipan® Yeast, made by Lesaffre, the world leader in yeast technology. Their mission is to take the fear out of baking with yeast. More information is available at redstaryeast.com.

The Kansas Wheat Commission is a farmer-funded and governed promotion organization working to secure the future of Kansas wheat globally and domestically through research, promotion, marketing and education. Kansas wheat farmers support the Kansas Wheat Commission with a voluntary two cent assessment on each bushel of wheat produced in Kansas. For more information, log onto kansaswheat.org.

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April Baking Calendar

Here are some handy dates to keep in mind as you are planning activities around baking during the month of April.

National Pretzel Month

Step-by-step pretzel baking

 

1: Sourdough Bread Day

Sourdough Bread

5: Caramel Day

Coconut Caramel Bar

7: World Health Day

Coffee Cake Day

11-18: Passover

11: Pet Day

How to make Pet Treats

13: Peach Cobbler Day

How-to-video

15: Easter breads

20: Pineapple Upside Down Cake Day

22: Meet the Farmer on Earth Day

23: Cherry Cheesecake Day

24: International Sculpture Day

25: Zucchini Bread Day

28: Blueberry Pie Day

30: Oatmeal Cookie Day

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Bake for Family Fun Month: Week 3

bakeforfamilyfun2016

As much as I enjoy Downton Abbey, history and tradition embodies why I bake. American families and communities most often did not come with a wait and culinary staff. “Doing for ourselves” included baking.

To quote Ruskin from a 1906 Cook Book compiled by Annie R. Gregory,

“ To be a good cook means the economy of your great-grandmothers and the science of modern chemists. It means much tasting and no wasting. It means English thoroughness, French art and Arabian hospitality. It means, in fine, that you are to see that everyone has something nice to eat.”

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This week’s Bake for Family Fun month connections highlight baking history and building our own traditions.

  1. Make time to Book and Bake. “Book” time to read a book and recipe for a meal or snack. Blueberries for Sal is a classic.
  2. Include, or require, young children and teens in the kitchen. Create a “baking corner” to work where they lay out tools and ingredients to prepare staples like Biscuits or America’s Favorite Batter Bread
  1. Weekly home crafted pizza is an essential tradition to help teens build assets and manage food budgets.
  2. Place your orders for Whole Grain All Star Pizza
  3. Doughnuts and fritters have long been a weekly treat in many homes! Consider a DIY dozen—it can cost less than $3.00—baked or fried 
  4. Pancake “art” is a fabulous family tradition. You won’t see IHOP making “your name here” cakes.  or  squiggle the batter for critters or shapes for max creativity. Remember: pre-oil, then heat the griddle or skillet, flip the shape when bubbles appear on the batter surface and flip ‘em only once for maximum fluff factor.

This week our daughter baked banana bread from a home town Centennial cook book. Virginia Becker, a genuinely wonderful woman and creator of the recipe, is surely smiling down on her magic mix of only six ingredients.

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