Tag Archives: baking

Blueberry Lemon Muffins

blueberries from freezer

These whole-grain muffins are so delicious, kids will never suspect they are loaded with healthy ingredients! Each muffin contains a little over 5 grams of added sugar*, far less than you would get in a commercial variety.

*Added sugar does not include the naturally occurring sugar found in the berries and yogurt.

Ingredients:
1 cup fresh, frozen or canned blueberries, rinsed and drained
1 ¼ cups whole wheat pastry flour
½ cup quick cooking oats
¼ cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs
1 cup Greek lemon yogurt
(if using the individual cartons, it will require about 1.5 containers)
¼ cup canola oil

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Use a non-stick muffin pan or paper muffin liners. (I prefer to use the silicone mini-muffin pans). Mix flour, sugar and baking powder in large mixing bowl. In another bowl, beat eggs and mix in yogurt and vegetable oil. Stir into dry ingredients and mix lightly. Fold in blueberries. Bake 18-20 minutes or until muffin tops are browned. Loosen muffins and serve warm. They also freeze well.

Servings: 12 medium muffins or 24 mini-muffins

Nutrition Facts

Source:
Connie Evers, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD
Author, How to Teach Nutrition to Kids
http://nutritionforkids.com

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Baking for My Valentine!

heartcookies

This week we celebrate week two of Bake for Family Fun Month with “Baking for My Valentine” themed recipes and activities. People have long baked for the simple reason they want to do something special for those they love, and we’ve got them covered! Here are three great ideas to make your Valentine’s Day celebrations spectacular.

Idea 1: Visit Bake for Family Fun Valentine baking ideas at the Home Baking Association website for hundreds of ideas! Seriously, it’s Valentine’s Day Central with plenty to share.

Idea 2: Find baking tips and How-to-Bake videos
and more

Idea 3: Make a plan to mix and fix for someone special.

Only time to measure, not bake? Prep a DIY Cookie Mix in a Jar

cookieinajar

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Week One: Bake for Family Fun Month

Week 1: Let’s Get Started Baking

If you don’t bake, or teach baking, why get started?

Today my top three reasons to step into the kitchen and bake with family or children in our world include words-to-the-wise from child development professionals.

Baking builds STEAM at home You can model experimentation and apply science, tech, engineering, art, math PLUS culture, history and literacy, by baking.

Step 1: Science and math both require accurate measuring skills! Check this out!

Step 2: Conduct a measuring experiment at home, some additional kitchen science about yeast.
51whbyegzdl “Can-Do Kids”: Author Richard Rende, child development psychologist, explains, “Getting in the kitchen together contributes to raising confident, successful team-players. When children help create the meal, they get curious; they build cognitive and multi-sensory connections.”

 

Step 1: Post a skills check list for each person to see their skills and techniques grow.

Step 2: Groove your kitchen and baking food safety guidelines.

End picky, less-than-healthy expensive eating. Begin anytime, but especially young…age 2 or 3! Kids who help create what’s served up want to taste it! Stanford U. Professor Maya Adam, MD confirms, “What about adding value to your family’s day-to-day interaction by spending more time in the kitchen and involving the children whenever possible? Some parents are understandably worried, but the health risks of not teaching a kid to cook are far greater than giving them a sharp object!”

Step 1: Choose simple recipes, list ingredients, shop and get started.

Step 2: Everybody cleans up!

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Association Recognizes WI Educator

January 26, 2017 – Each year an outstanding baking educator is selected that has conducted an innovative programs that teaches kids to bake. The Home Baking Association (HBA) recognized Delaine Stendahl, Whitehall, WI with the 2016 Educator Award. Stendahl is a family & consumer sciences educator at Whitehall Memorial Schools in Whitehall, WI.

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Her winning lesson The Power of Eggs is used in a Food Science & Nutrition course for students in grades 9-12 and focuses on the use of eggs in baking and the multiple roles eggs play in food preparation. Students learn the scientific role of eggs in recipes. Stendahl will include The Power of Eggs lesson in a week-long culinary workshop she is conducting this summer for family and consumer sciences educators. HBA congratulates Stendahl and encourages educators to use the FREE lesson in classrooms or community program.

HBA is seeking entries for the 2017 award. Who’s eligible to enter? Anyone that teaches baking! Family & consumer sciences educators and leaders of community organizations and after-school programs are encouraged to share baking programs. Youth teaching other youth are also eligible. Entries may be classroom lessons, baking activities or projects that encourage children to bake.

HBA believes baking plays an important role in the development of healthy children. Skills are developed for do-it-yourself baking and as children grow, new skills are added to provide more baking opportunities. HBA is a nonprofit association and annually recognizes educators that implement outstanding, interdisciplinary baking education programs. Thirty-seven corporate and association members provide lessons, activities, test kitchen recipes and other resources.   For more information visit HomeBaking.org. Entry deadline is March 31.

For more information contact:

Charlene Patton, Executive Director, 785.478.3283

hbapatton@aol.com

 

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The Power of Eggs

eggs_blogEvery ingredient in baking packs its own unique power.   January is perfect to focus on the simple but powerful egg. Here to help is the 2016 Home Baking Association educator award winner, Delaine Stendahl. Her new lesson, The Power of Eggs, is now available online. In her award-winning lesson, bakers explore how eggs function to:

  1. Leaven, or add air spaces. Long before we had baking soda or powder we relied on beaten whole eggs or whites to add air to batter. Waffles and angel food cakes are perfect examples of beaten egg white foam used to leaven in recipes.
  2. Bind, or hold together ingredients when baked, like cracked wheat and lean beef meatballs, soft cookies, cake or muffins.
  3.  Coagulate and hold the shape and open texture of baked goods, like cream puffs and popovers. Meringue can stand alone when baked as a gluten-free cookie like the Forgotten Cookie (Baking with Friends, HomeBaking.org ) or topping a pie or even as a pie shell. My mother made meringue as a savory egg-in-a-nest entrée.
  4. Emulsify or hold together in suspension two ingredients that don’t like to mix, as liquid and fat in a pudding or a lemon curd .
  5. Provide smooth texture in the pound cake or egg-rich yeast breads, and Portuguese Sweet Bread.
  6. Add color and browning with egg as an ingredient or by using an egg wash brushed on the surface of breads just before baking. View How to Use an Egg Wash. Also, check out our Dough Sculpting 101 lesson–  Learn to egg wash, p. 3
  7. Nourish morning, noon, snacks or night. Eggs, at only 70 calories each, add 13 essential vitamins and minerals such as vitamins B12, D and E, choline, and iron, 6 grams protein, and minimal sodium and sugars.

The Power of Eggs as a baking ingredient is delivered via foods we love. Eggs are great to “use what we have on hand” for family meals, crepes, egg noodles, omelets, frittatas, make-ahead stratas, hard-cooked in sandwiches or tossed salads and for nutritious desserts like early colonial puddings , custards, and flan.

Want to learn more? Check out A Bakers Dozen DVD Lessons for Better Baking or A Bakers Dozen Lab Manual for more about eggs as the super baking ingredient.

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Don’t forget to enter YOUR great baking lesson. You may receive the 2017 Educator Award. Go to HomeBaking.org for more info.

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Smart Snacks

spicecake

Crisp fall days remind me of great after school snacks. We knew the ropes. We could have a piece of fruit, 2 cookies and milk. The fruit and the cookies were small in those days. What came next was equally important: a list of chores – indoors or out. We lounged about a half hour, then it was time to get busy.

“Smart snacking” wasn’t on the radar then, but our snack limits and activities (chores) were–all without a government agency within 200 miles. Today government gets involved because so many children are overweight or obese and snacks make up at least 27% of their daily calories. (Trends in Snacking Among U.S. Children view here)

HBA staff rolled up their sleeves to address the latest snack guidelines for schools along with Kansas State Department of Education’s Team Nutrition. Guidelines for in-school snacks can be found here.

Our goal: Provide bakers at home, in Family & Consumer Sciences classrooms, school clubs and cafeterias A Baker’s Dozen Smart

Snack Baking Recipes!

The Top 5 “smart snack baking” steps we used for developing the recipes include:

  1. Use 51% or more whole grain – whole wheat flour, oatmeal, whole cornmeal, flax meal are whole grains used in the recipes. Every serving is 8g or more whole grain.
    Baking with Whole Wheat Flour
  2. Portion control— we have to lose the “mega-sized” rolls, bread sticks, cookies, cupcakes or bars. A look at the Portion Distortion Interactive quizzes helps tell the story of our American weight gain.
  1. Control sugars with an icing drizzle…no ½-inch frostings.
  2. Reduce saturated fat—cream vegetable oil with butter and used flax meal egg substitute in some recipes. Check out this Kitchen Science handout
  3. Home-baking recipes are often less sodium than commercially baked goods. Using vegetable oil and unsalted butter also reduce sodium.

HBA can’t assign active chores for kids to get them moving, but we can offer A Baker’s Dozen Smart Snack Baking Recipes. The recipes can all be served or sold in school hours and include:

smart_snacks_bakersdozen

Breakfast: Oatmeal Fruit Bars; Apple Cinnamon Rolls; Carrot Streusel Coffeecake

Breads: Bread Sticks; Confetti Cornbread (still testing!) and Soft Pretzels

Cakes: Buttermilk Chocolate; Carrot Cupcakes and Spice Snack Cake

Cookies: Cinnamon Crunch; Double Chocolate; Oatmeal; Soft and Chewy Chocolate Chip; Soft Sugar

Dessert: Country Fruit Cobbler

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Celebrate National Breakfast Month

September is National Breakfast Month

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If back to school means back to busy mornings at your house, don’t let the hectic rush force you to sacrifice breakfast. September is National Breakfast Month – a good time to commit to incorporating a smart morning meal into your family’s daily routine.

Make sure that breakfast is as healthy as it is tasty by including grains and protein as part of the meal. Grains are an important part of daily dietary needs; strive for two or three servings each morning to get a good start on the six servings you need each day. Protein means staying power: these foods will keep you and your kids feeling energized all morning long. Here are some tips to help ensure that your family gets a nutritious start to even the busiest of days:

  • Making a simple, healthy breakfast can be one of a young child’s first “I can do that!” moments in the kitchen. Set out two or three boxes of favorite cereals and teach your preschooler to pour it into a bowl. Use a small scoop or measuring cup to demonstrate portion size. Incorporate her participation into the morning routine, and before you know it, she really will be handling it by herself.
  • Teach kids the difference in the nutrition profile of cereal by using the “topping” method. Three-quarters of the bowl could be a whole grain, low-sugar cereal.
    Colored cereals or those with higher sugar content can be sprinkled lightly on top.
  • Use weekends wisely. If you’re whipping up pancakes or waffles one lazy Saturday morning, make an extra batch to be enjoyed during the week. Wrap in plastic, store in the refrigerator or freezer, and warm in the microwave or toaster when ready to eat.
  • For a fast, tasty start to the morning, nothing beats the simplicity of toast. Top with peanut, almond or cashew butter, or melted goat or feta cheese, for protein staying-power. A sprinkle of fresh herbs like chopped basil or sage, or a spice like ground ginger or cinnamon, adds important anti-oxidants.
  • Also easy: Toast an English muffin or bagel, and add a sliced hard-boiled egg, slice of ham, Swiss cheese or anything else you have on hand that appeals to your taste buds for a quick breakfast sandwich.
  • Absolutely no prep time? Open a box of whole wheat crackers, grab a banana or apple, and head out the door!
  • Kids will enjoy creating their own combinations of breakfast trail mix. Fill small plastic baggies with a mix of healthful, whole grain cereals, sunflower seeds, chopped almonds or walnuts and dried fruit. Keep a stash on hand to grab when eating in the car.
  • And finally: Get in the habit of taking 10 minutes before turning off the kitchen lights each night to set up for the next morning. Make sure that backpacks, homework and balls for after-school soccer practice are in place. Recharge your cell phone. Clear the kitchen counter. Little tasks like these take up valuable time on busy mornings; addressing them the night before will leave more time to focus on breakfast the next day

 

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